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Alan Watts Zen

Watts was the author of some twenty books on the philosophy and psychology of religion that have been published in many languages throughout the world, including the bestselling The Way of Zen. An avid lecturer, Watts appeared regularly on the radio and hosted the popular television series, Eastern Wisdom and Modern Life,in the 1960s. The Alan Watts Organization is dedicated to preserving Alan’s legacy through archival efforts and creative partnerships. Our goal is to make his work accessible digitally as well as through traditional media, and to help spread his message to future generations.

Author: Watts, Alan

Brand: Vintage

Color: Green

Edition: Later Printing Used

Features:

  • Great product!

Binding: Paperback

Number Of Pages: 256

Release Date: 26-01-1999

Details: Product DescriptionIn his definitive introduction to Zen Buddhism, Alan Watts ('the perfect guide for a course correction in life' —Deepak Chopra), explains the principles and practices of this ancient religion. With a rare combination of freshness and lucidity, he delves into the origins and history of Zen to explain what it means for the world today with incredible clarity. Watts saw Zen as “one of the most precious gifts of Asia to the world,” and inThe Way of Zen he gives this gift to readers everywhere.“Perhaps the foremost interpreter of Eastern disciplines for the contemporary West, Watts had the rare gift of ‘writing beautifully the unwritable.’”—Los Angeles TimesAmazon.com ReviewAfter D.T. Suzuki, Alan Watts stands as the godfather of Zen in America. Often taken to task for inspiring the flimsy spontaneity of Beat Zen, Watts had an undeniably keen understanding of his subject. Nowhere is this more evident than in his 1957 classicThe Way of Zen, which has been reissued. Watts takes the reader back to the philosophical foundations of Zen in the conceptual world of Hinduism, follows Buddhism's course through the development of the early Mahayana school, the birth of Zen from Buddhism's marriage with Chinese Taoism, and on to Zen's unique expression in Japanese art and life. As a Westerner, Watts anticipates the stumbling blocks encountered with such concepts as emptiness and no-mind, then illustrates with flawlessly apt examples. Many popular books have been written on Zen since Watts' time, but few have been able to muster the rare combination of erudition and clarity that have keptThe Way of Zen in readers' hands decade after decade. --Brian BruyaReview“Perhaps the foremost interpreter of Eastern disciplines for the contemporary West, Watts had the rare gift of ‘writing beautifully the unwritable.’”—Los Angeles TimesAbout the AuthorAlan W. Watts, who held both a master’s degree in theology and a doctorate of divinity, is best remembered as an interpreter of Zen Buddhism in particular, and of Indian and Chinese philosophy in general. Standing apart, however, from sectarian membership, he has earned the reputation of being one of the most original and “unrutted” philosophers of the twentieth century. Watts was the author of some twenty books on the philosophy and psychology of religion that have been published in many languages throughout the world, including the bestselling The Way of Zen. An avid lecturer, Watts appeared regularly on the radio and hosted the popular television series, Eastern Wisdom and Modern Life,in the 1960s. He died in 1973.

Package Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.1 x 0.6 inches

Alan Watts Zen Master

Languages: English

Alan Watts Zen
The Way of Zen
AuthorAlan Watts
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SubjectZen Buddhism, Philosophy, Mahayana Buddhism
GenreNon-fiction
Published1957
PublisherVintage Books
Media typePrint
ISBN978-0375705106

The Way of Zen is a 1957 non-fiction book on Zen Buddhism and Eastern philosophy by philosopher and religious scholar Alan Watts. It was a bestseller and played a major role in introducing Buddhism to a mostly young, Western audience.[1][2]

Alan Watts Zen

Content[edit]

The Way of Zen is divided into two sections, the first which deals with the background and historical development of Zen Buddhism, and the latter which focuses on the principles and practices. The second half has sections that include 'Empty and Marvelous,' 'Sitting Quietly, Doing Nothing,' 'Za-zen and the Koan,' and 'Zen and the Arts.' [3]

Watts traces the origin of Zen Buddhism as a synthesis of Chinese Taoism and Mahayana Buddhism. Watts introduces the reader to a variety of Eastern philosophical concepts such as wuwei, Middle Way and anatman. Watts portrays the western philosophical tradition as being intrinsically limited by the strict adherence to logical structures as opposed to eastern philosophy which is not bound by these structures.

References[edit]

Watts Way Of Zen

  1. ^Timothy Miller, ed. (1995). America's Alternative Religions. State University of New York Press. p. 164. ISBN978-1438430935.
  2. ^Kevin Starr (2009). Golden Dreams: California in an Age of Abundance, 1950-1963. Oxford University Press. p. 420. ISBN978-0195153774.
  3. ^Watts, Alan (1957). The Way of Zen. New York City: Pantheon Books.


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